South Dakota’s Refurbished American Citizen Internment Camp Not Vacant For Long

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Seen Here Is Merely One Wing Of The Massive And Elaborate American Citizen Internment Camp In South Dakota's Black Hills National Forest

Seen Here Is Merely One Wing Of The Massive And Elaborate American Citizen Internment Camp In South Dakota’s Black Hills National Forest

The US Government recently finished renovations on the Black Hills National Forest American citizen internment camp in South Dakota. This refurbished World War II  prison  location near Rapid City, SD is built on several acres of lush forestry,  allowing for a picturesque view of the countryside.

The Obama administration is expected to start filling the camp’s vacancy status  by the end of November. Individuals who are found to oppose particular Government regulations. Peace activists. Tea Party members. Suspects with potential links to terrorism. They will all find a new home behind the barbwire gates of Camp Black Hill.

I was able to see the accommodations firsthand during my tour of the grounds on Monday. The Black Hill’s American citizen internment camp had allowed me to pay it a visit on behalf of National Report to cover the grand unveiling. I was immediately surprised by how large and well maintained the grounds were.

Leading me into the main gatehouse, Lt. Shroder and I walked through a magnificent garden that seemed right out of a fairytale. Inside, there were game rooms, spas, basketball courts… The list went on. It started to seem  less like a prison camp and more a pleasant getaway resort for wealthy folks. Lt. Shroder began:

“These are precarious times we live in. It’s not like it was back in the 60’s or 70’s. It was one thing to be ridicule Government policies then, but in today’s strange climate, the public’s erratic behavior, and with the advent of the internet and information being shareable worldwide with a simple click of a button… We simply cannot chance the problems that may arise from one or two rogue Americans going against their homeland.”

The Government is merciful still, as these spacious and comfortable keep the safety and dignity of the incarcerated civilian at the forefront of it’s design.

We rode a golf cart to and from locations on the expansive compound. We visited the barracks, which were separated into individual pods, each the space of a hotel room. The architecture had all been upgraded and the quarters state of the art.

While camp-goers will have no internet, telephone service, nor be allowed visits from friends and family, it will come equipped with many comforts of the outside world. For instance, there’s not only an onsite McDonalds, but a Taco-Bell and Wal-Mart as well.

“It’s important for the people staying here to understand they aren’t necessarily in trouble. We just can chance allowing them to be free at this point in time.”

Before ending my tour of the property, I began wondering what I might do to get confined within its luxurious walls? Some of these dwellings are nicer and more spacious than my own apartment. It also got me thinking… Maybe this whole American citizen internment camp thing isn’t such a big deal after all. Maybe, just maybe the Government really is looking out for our best interests… Sometimes.

In closing: Where can this journalist sign up?!

Jane M. Agni (2013, September 20)
Originally Published On National Report
www.nationalreport.net
http://nationalreport.net/american-citizen-internment-camp-south-dakota-black-hills-national-forest/

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Jane Agni

Jane Agni

Jane M. Agni is a professional journalist residing in the rain-soaked city of Portland, Oregon. She is currently Editor-In-Chief of the websites, Every Woman Weekly, and Self-Worth Digest, in addition to being Senior Journalist for the infamous news satire site, National Report. Follow Jane on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus for daily updates on new articles and more.
Jane Agni

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